Old School New Body Day Three

I'm still continuing with the Old School New Body workout advanced plan.  When I write about different topics, I mention beginners from time to time as I point out things for them to take note of.   Keep in mind that even though this is advanced, a beginner can do it if they are generally healthy and active.   It can be adapted and modified to each person's fitness.  However, there are workouts within this program that are more tailored to beginners.  

Yesterday's workout was Delts and Arms or shoulders, biceps and triceps.  With this workout, there are 11 exercises with 38 total sets.  

How I feel this morning: My shoulders aren't too sore.  I feel them when I lift my arms above my head.  Not soreness, just awareness that I worked them and they were stimulated.  Another reason I feel them is because one of the exercises was new and also the tempo and pace.  

This program is set up to use the same weight all the way through the set.  Not the workout, but just that set.  For example, if I were doing shoulder presses, I would do 30# for every set.  Then if I moved onto lateral raises, I would do 15# for every set.   I like the rest periods with this program.  It keeps you moving forward and I think for beginners that is especially good.  

Old School New Body


This workout begins with the largest of today's muscle groups, the deltoids.   Some people call these the shoulder caps.  Nice round shoulders can really make people take notice.  The shoulder needs to be worked from all sides and that means front, side and rear.   Since the total deltoid is a round shape, you don't want to neglect any one part.

There are four exercises that target the shoulders.  It has 14 sets.   Two of the exercises have four sets and the other two have three sets.  This is a good overall workload for an average person like me.  Just for comparison, professional bodybuilders in the 70's might do 25 sets for just one body part.  

This program works the arms on the same day.   In other words, biceps and triceps together.  Some programs will split these up, but not the Old School New Body advanced program.  I like that this program works the whole arm at once.  It doesn't alternate from one muscle group to the next, it  does each one in succession.   

Triceps get four exercises with 14 total sets.  Basic exercises like extensions and pushdowns.

Biceps get 3 exercises with 10 total sets.   Less seen (at least for me) exercises such as incline hammer dumbbell curls.

Why do the triceps get more work?  I don't know, but my guess is because the tricep is the larger of the two muscles and just requires more work.

I'm definitely feeling my arms today.  They are fatigued and maybe mildly soar.   That is what you want to feel.  You want to know that it's working as in feel that it's working.  With any program, you want to start feeling like you're getting stronger.  I'll see how the strength improves as I go forward.  

This has NOTHING  to do with this program, but one thing I don't like about my gym is that they don't have half sizes on the dumbbells.  Ours go up by 5 pounds each.  Half sizes are 12.5#, 17.5#, 22.5# and so on.   This makes it easier to progress.  If your gym has half sizes, consider yourself lucky because working arms is where this is beneficial.   With other exercises like chest and back, not as much.

I'm very excited about this program.  As I mentioned on day one, I've done the advanced phase before. However, I didn't do it fully.  I just used it as a fill in for some other training I was doing at the time.  I want to see how this one really works my arms moving forward.  I'm always ready to go to the gym every morning, but a bit more the last few days.  I think I've said this before, but I like how this program is written.   I don't mean designed, I mean the way it is written (typed) on paper.  It's easy to follow and easy to see what is next and how many sets, etc.  No trigonometry needed.

Who am I and what do I know?

Read more about it here.


​​​​

About the Author Health Wealth

I'm just an average 40 something guy with a family who wants to help people get fit and healthy. I have a bachelor's degree in Physical Education (UTEP 1991) and a Master's degree in Kinesiology (Sam Houston State University 1993) I became a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC) in 1994 from the National Athletic Trainer's Association. I became a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) from the National Strength and Conditioning Association in 1999. I have worked out (mostly) in some form or fashion since high school. I'm not super fit and I don't have a six-pack. I've don't Spartan and a few other obstacle races.  I've done home fitness DVD's and worked out at gyms. I'm not a runner or a Crossfitter. I don't eat perfectly, but do understand it's importance. There are too many people who are not healthy and too many people who don't know how to enter the fitness world.  There are too many personal trainers that are not qualified to work with people, especially beginners. There are too many false thoughts, gadgets, and expectations and I want to guide people down the right path so that they have success. If I share a product or service with an affiliate link, I either use the product or know the product. I don't know everything, but I know a thing or two.

Leave a Comment: